Boronia

Bush Stone Curlew

Powerful Owl Family

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Sydney Red Gum

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Eastern Water Dragon

Yellow-faced Whipsnake – ©Jayden Walsh

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Pittwater Mist

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Tongue Orchid

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Beetle

Tyler’s Tree Frog – ©Jayden Walsh

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Drosera spatulata

Fungi

Sweet-scented Wattle

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Darwinia

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Common Tree Snake – ©Jayden Walsh

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NSW Christmas Bush

 

Latest News

Latest News

Wednesday November 25th, 2020

Have a look at our Mona Vale Dunes bush regeneration site progress, in before and after photos. Work began early this year. Dense bitou bush, green cestrum, lantana and asparagus completely covered this area. A few desperate native plants have been revealed. Bush regen contractors are working here funded by a grant to PNHA from the Federal Government's communities environment program. We will be planting tubestock here in autumn 2021. The site is now becoming visible from the pathway between Golf Ave and south Mona Vale headland. ... See MoreSee Less

Have a look at our Mona Vale Dunes bush regeneration site progress, in before and after photos. Work began early this year. Dense bitou bush, green cestrum, lantana and asparagus completely covered this area. A few desperate native plants have been revealed. Bush regen contractors are working here funded by a grant to PNHA from the Federal Governments communities environment program. We will be planting tubestock here in autumn 2021. The site is now becoming visible from the pathway between Golf Ave and south Mona Vale headland.Image attachmentImage attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Here you are, Sally Lynch, an explanation of the site you see on your walks, so you can follow it’s progress. The task is massive. Marita is a legend, obtaining grants for contract work & galvanising the Bushcare team. I’m not involved in that one except for growing some plants for the autumn plantings.

Looks good Robyn! Wont see you in dec but will be down in mid February!!xx

We've been watching the progress. Fantastic! Great to see the Blue Tongue Lizards and hear the Whip Birds again.

Thursday November 12th, 2020

Dwarf Apple buds, Angophora hispida. This heathland shrub is a stunner in early summer, very popular with insects, particularly beetles. Chiltern Track at Ingleside is a place to go for a close up view of this lovely plant in a week or two. The red hairs probably protect the developing flowers, as Angophoras, unlike Eucalypts, don't have a little cap over the stamens of the flowers. ... See MoreSee Less

Dwarf Apple buds, Angophora hispida. This heathland shrub is a stunner in early summer, very popular with insects,  particularly beetles. Chiltern Track at Ingleside is a place to go for a close up view of this lovely plant in a week or two. The red hairs probably protect the developing flowers, as Angophoras, unlike Eucalypts, dont have a little cap over the stamens of the flowers.

Tuesday November 3rd, 2020

Abstract art, by Nature, the world's greatest artist. Spotted Gum bark on a wet morning. ... See MoreSee Less

Abstract art, by Nature, the worlds greatest artist. Spotted Gum bark on a wet morning.

 

Comment on Facebook

They’re magic at this time of year

That is beautiful . Look at those colours !

Sunday November 1st, 2020

Trad, that dreaded weed, may be about to meet its match in the Pittwater area and hopefully everywhere. PNHA has been tracking the progress of a biocontrol agent, a leaf fungus, trialled by the CSIRO. Last week we received a box of infected Trad and planted it at three sites on October 28 so it could infect healthy Trad. Watch for Trad going yellow: 1 on the right of the first boardwalk towards Irrawong Waterfall, 2, in part of McCarrs Creek Reserve, 3, Bangalley Head Reserve near . Whale Beach Rd. Photos: 1. Marita Macrae, Julie Bennett, David Palmer and Edna Blanchard with the infected Trad. 2. Planting the stems beside the boardwalk. NO, IT'S NOT ANOTHER CANE TOAD. More info: blog.csiro.au/smut-to-the-rescue/ ... See MoreSee Less

Trad, that dreaded weed, may be about to meet its match in the Pittwater area and hopefully everywhere. PNHA has been tracking the progress of a biocontrol agent, a leaf fungus, trialled by the CSIRO. Last week we received a box of infected Trad and planted it at three sites on October 28 so it could infect healthy Trad. Watch for Trad going yellow: 1 on the right of the first boardwalk towards Irrawong Waterfall, 2, in part of McCarrs Creek Reserve, 3, Bangalley Head Reserve near . Whale Beach Rd. Photos: 1. Marita Macrae, Julie Bennett, David Palmer and Edna Blanchard with the infected Trad. 2. Planting the stems beside the boardwalk. NO, ITS NOT ANOTHER CANE TOAD. More info: https://blog.csiro.au/smut-to-the-rescue/Image attachmentImage attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

I'd love to try it along Narrabeen Creek in Warriewood which is now overrun by trad!

Great work, PNHA volunteers!

Fantastic guys!!

Sunday November 1st, 2020

Frog ID week starts November 6. Get the Frog ID app on your phone or IPad to record a call and help Australian Museum frog experts map our frog species.

Image: Southern Barred Frog (Mixophyes balbus) by Jodi Rowley.

Thanks to your FrogID submissions from all across Australia, the FrogID team have produced seven scientific papers so far. This month, FrogID research revealed that Australian frogs indeed have accents, and their accents change across the country, and even over time. We also used FrogID data to take a closer look at just how much frogs restrict their calling to night-time, and found that most Australian frogs actually call during the day, some at surprisingly high rates!

All the research produced by the FrogID project is a reminder of how your records are providing information about frogs on scales never before possible. Last month, we revealed how your FrogID records are providing an early understanding of frogs persisting after the Black Summer bushfires, but this picture is not yet complete. Your continued use of FrogID is very important this year, more than ever.

Whether you’re at a nearby creek, pond, nature reserve, or your own backyard – every recording of a frog call contributes to our research. So far, FrogID has identified more than 250,000 frog calls and identified 199 of the known 242 Australian frog species. During FrogID Week last year, over 5,000 frog records from 71 species were counted! The best way to stay up to date with this year’s FrogID Week information, stats, and exciting discoveries, is by following us on social media.

If you're planning any FrogID Week activities in your community and would like help seeking local media opportunities, let us know by emailing calls@frogid.net.au

With La Niña underway and the likelihood of above average rainfall across much of Australia, we hope more frogs will be breeding and calling this year. Head outside each day of FrogID Week and help us find calling frogs – together, we can build our understanding and better protect our frog species.

Safe frogging, everyone!
... See MoreSee Less

Frog ID week starts November 6. Get the Frog ID app on your phone or IPad to record a call and help Australian Museum frog experts map our frog species.

Image: Southern Barred Frog (Mixophyes balbus) by Jodi Rowley.

Thanks to your FrogID submissions from all across Australia, the FrogID team have produced seven scientific papers so far. This month, FrogID research revealed that Australian frogs indeed have accents, and their accents change across the country, and even over time. We also used FrogID data to take a closer look at just how much frogs restrict their calling to night-time, and found that most Australian frogs actually call during the day, some at surprisingly high rates!

All the research produced by the FrogID project is a reminder of how your records are providing information about frogs on scales never before possible. Last month, we revealed how your FrogID records are providing an early understanding of frogs persisting after the Black Summer bushfires, but this picture is not yet complete. Your continued use of FrogID is very important this year, more than ever.

Whether you’re at a nearby creek, pond, nature reserve, or your own backyard – every recording of a frog call contributes to our research. So far, FrogID has identified more than 250,000 frog calls and identified 199 of the known 242 Australian frog species. During FrogID Week last year, over 5,000 frog records from 71 species were counted! The best way to stay up to date with this year’s FrogID Week information, stats, and exciting discoveries, is by following us on social media.

If youre planning any FrogID Week activities in your community and would like help seeking local media opportunities, let us know by emailing calls@frogid.net.au

With La Niña underway and the likelihood of above average rainfall across much of Australia, we hope more frogs will be breeding and calling this year. Head outside each day of FrogID Week and help us find calling frogs – together, we can build our understanding and better protect our frog species.

Safe frogging, everyone!Image attachmentImage attachment
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About PNHA

About PNHA

With urbanisation, there are continuing pressures that threaten the beautiful natural environment of Pittwater. Some impacts are immediate and apparent, others are more gradual and less obvious.


The Pittwater Natural Heritage Association has been formed to act to protect and preserve the Pittwater areas major and most valuable asset - its natural heritage.


PNHA is an incorporated association seeking broad based community membership and support to enable it to have an effective and authoritative voice speaking out for the preservation of Pittwater's natural heritage.


PNHA is an incorporated association seeking broad based community membership and support to enable it to have an effective and authoritative voice speaking out for the preservation of Pittwater's natural heritage. It is a member of the Pittwater Community Alliance. Please contact us for further information.

If you would like to make a tax-deductible donation to benefit Pittwater's natural environment go to the Pittwater Environmental Foundation.

Our Aims

  • To raise public awareness of the conservation value of the natural heritage of the Pittwater area: its landforms, watercourses, soils and local native vegetation and fauna.
  • To raise public awareness of the threats to the long-term sustainability of Pittwater's natural heritage.
  • To foster individual and community responsibility for caring for this natural heritage.
  • To encourage Pittwater Council and the NSW Government to adopt and implement policies and works which will conserve, sustain and enhance the natural heritage of Pittwater.

Our Charter

Pittwater Natural Heritage Association seeks to raise awareness and provide information and advice to our members on issues such as:

Native Tree Canopy

Identification of trees local to your particular area. What to plant to replace dead or dying trees, and how to care for trees. The characteristic form of the native tree canopy is a major contributor to Pittwater's sense of place.

"Bush Friendly" Gardens

Selecting plants for your garden that will live in harmony with nearby bushland and provide habitat for native animals and birds.

Building and Landscaping

Promoting practices which preserve and protect the visual qualities of the landform, preserve soil stability and prevent erosion of steep slopes and siltation of waterways.

Weed Infestation

Information on noxious and environmental weeds, weed identification and methods of control and eradication.

Living with Wildlife

Maintaining habitat and wildlife corridors for our rich and diverse native fauna. Understanding the impacts of introduced birds and animals and uncontrolled domestic pets.

Keeping our Waterways Healthy

Using and enjoying our waterways and estuaries whilst maintaining appropriate water quality and habitat for aquatic creatures. Caring for the streams, wetlands, saltmarsh and mangrove systems that are an integral part of our waterways.

Rock Platforms, Beaches and Dunes

Protecting and preserving the plant and animal communities on rock platforms. Restoration and regeneration of dune systems and maintenance of their stability.

Act to Preserve and Protect!

If you would like to join us, please fill out the Membership Application Form. Alternatively if you would like to contact us for information on any of our projects, our details are:

Email: pnhainfo@gmail.com

Postal Address
PO Box 187
Avalon Beach NSW 2107

President
Marita Macrae

Other Environmental Organisations

STEP Inc.  
STEP is a community-based environmental organisation with over 400 members from Ku-ring-gai, Hornsby and surrounding suburbs. Their primary aim is to work for the conservation of bushland in northern Sydney.

 

Australian Plants Society NSW
The Australian Plants Society NSW Ltd is made up of members from all walks of life who have a passion to learn about, share, grow and conserve Australian native plants and their habitats. 

 

Northern Beaches Council - Environment
Safeguarding the Northern Beaches unique living environment. 

 

Birdlife Australia
BirdLife Australia is dedicated to creating a bright future for Australia’s birds.

 

Sydney Nature
Find out about the huge variety of native plants and animals across Sydney, the benefits they provide and how you can support native plants and animals in your local area.

 

Sydney Wildlife
As well as caring for sick, injured and orphaned native wildlife, Sydney Wildlife is also involved in educating the community about native wildlife and its habitat.

How to Remove Asparagus Fern

How to Remove Lantana

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